Got $100 Bucks? Buy this 3D Printer & Make Anything!

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Peachy Printer - Logo
DogBadge Writers Marshal Rosenthal
Marshal Rosenthal is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer specializing...
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by Marshal M. Rosenthal

Who wouldn’t want a 3D printer? You know what we mean, being able to print out physical objects at home is like  having Tony Stark’s lab to play with. But with great power comes great….cost, because 3D printers aren’t cheap. But that could change once the $100 Peachy 3D Printer becomes available. We’ll check the printer out by checking in with its owner, inventor and visionary Rylan Grayston.

Man Cave Daily
What’s so cool about 3D printers?

Rylan Grayston - Framegrab

Courtesy of Rylan Grayston

Rylan Grayston
That’s such a big question that it’s hard to wrap the mind around the answer — think of it as akin to a magic wand, you wave the mouse around and an object comes flying out. It’s very liberating.

Man Cave Daily
Why has a 3D printer been so costly up to now?

Rylan Grayston
Let’s take the analogy of how a plane can still fly if the engine is turned off, while a helicopter sans power drops like a rock. 3D printers in the past have worked like ‘copters, they “force” the process to occur. What we’re doing is more like that of a plane, in that we work with nature, the natural properties of water and how it wants to be flat (like that of a lake if left alone). So here the liquid resin is floating on the water which allows us to get rid of things like microprocessors and bearings and a rigid frame to keep the platform flat. We’re using a drip system instead that makes the level of resin rise without being forced — all because water wants to be flat and rises with no costs.

Man Cave Daily
So what’s different about the Peachy 3D Printer?

Printed Cube - Hollow

Photo courtesy of Rylan Grayston

Rylan Grayston
First, the Peachy 3D Printer is as simple to use as a paper-based printer; just plug the Peachy into your computer like it was headphones. Then click on a 3D object online — there’s a lot of websites out there that have 3D files already rendered for you to work with (Thingiverse.com for example). That’s it, a simple process. Of course it can be more complicated should you be editing the object, which you could do in a freeware 3D program like Blender. But the main thing is that it’s empowering.

One way to think of Peachy is that it’s like a coffee maker, just no hot water. You put water into the top and the water drains down to the bottom and makes the resin rise to the top as the object is formed. Then you pull the object out, maybe cure it in the sun for a bit to harden it best. Then repeat to make something new.

Man Cave Daily
But is the resin safe for use?

Rylan Grayston
We’ve knocked down the level of toxicity of the resin quite a bit and, while we don’t as  yet have a set recipe for it, plan on making it very safe to use (keeping in mind you don’t want to get it on your hands or in your eyes). We’d love to see the Peachy used in kindergarten classrooms in the future — so you can imagine how safe everything will have to be.  It’s certainly safe enough for use in high schools.

Man Cave Daily
What’s the big difference between the Peachy 3D printer and others now out?

3D Scanner Framegrab

Photo courtesy of Rylan Grayston

Rylan Grayston
Often an inventor doesn’t have a clue what his invention is going to be used for and that’s certainly true in this case, as 3D printers evolve they could be used for practically anything. What’s unique is that there’s no set volume, it’s  not about a certain sized “space” that the object’s dimensions are restricted to. You could take the printer and use a garbage can as the container and so have an larger object than if there was an attached container on the printer. Me, I’m personally curious about printing out a canoe.

Keep in mind that this printer is flexible because of the laser’s properties: like that of a common flashlight, the beam from the laser increases in size as it moves farther away, so that’s why larger container sizes results in larger objects being able to be made. We’ve only done small print jobs for now to check on the Peachy’s capabilities and reliability, but there’s no known restrictions as to the container’s size.

Man Cave Daily
When will the printer be available?

Rylan Grayston
We’re on Kickstarter and looking to deliver the printer in the second quarter of 2014 — this might occur earlier if our backers increase (we’ve 3700 now and collected over $530,000).

Man Cave Daily
So you think a $100 3D printer will make a big splash on the consumer?

Rylan Grayston
The price point of $100 is huge! Nearly every person on Earth thinks a 3D printer is cool and would love to have one if it was affordable and easy to use — the Peachy 3D printer is. We’re also looking into how useful this could be in 3D world countries since the supply chain for making small plastic parts isn’t so great — I was just talking with someone from Africa about this. We see the Peachy 3D printer changing the landscape of 3D printers, where having to spend thousands of dollars was the default, and bringing it to anyone who wants it.


We bet the theme song's playing in your head right now.

We bet the theme song’s playing in your head right now.

Marshal Rosenthal is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer specializing in technology, consumer electronics and pop culture. Visit his website.

Mark Setrakian in exo-suit with training robot used in the time challenge featured in the premiere episode.

Mark Setrakian in exo-suit with training robot used in the time challenge featured in the premiere episode.

Marshal found the sound of the future in Christopher Tyng’s 31st Century Beat and learned how to build his own battle bot when he interviewed Sy-Fy’s Mark Setrakian in Slaughterbots: Roll Out!

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